NowCar 2019 Chevrolet Blazer

Five Things to Know About the New Chevy Blazer

Written By, Jordan R.

Last week we discussed a little about the Chevrolet Blazer crossover, the new vehicle coming from Chevrolet. It would seem automakers all over are starting to resurrect new versions of old vehicles. Mitsubishi did it with the Eclipse sports car and is doing the same with the good ol’ Mitsubishi Lancer. Fiat Chrysler Automobiles has electrified Jeep vehicles in their five-year plan, most of which are just electrified versions of their current lineup models. Now, Chevrolet is joining the fad, by bringing its old but popular off-road vehicle, the original Chevy Blazer, back to life. We won’t be seeing it until 2019, but there are a few things consumers should know.

1. Key Dates to Watch Out For

Did our last article on the Chevrolet Blazer give you an itch? Then just wait until we do a landing page and give readers all the juicy details (coming soon). Until then, we have two time frames with terms that the average consumer wouldn’t know a thing about. Luckily, they have us.

- Early Q4, First Consensus and First DOSP. What this means is, in the late Fall or early Winter of 2018, the First Consensus and DOSP will take place.

The First Consensus is when Chevrolet (and General Motors) will determine how many units of the Blazer crossover can be allocated to a dealership based on their inventory. This allocation may also be adjusted based on how many Chevy SUVs and crossovers the dealer previously sold, to make sure units won’t be sent to an unworthy location. A final consensus will follow to lock in the number of units allocated to each dealer.

“DOSP” stands for “Dealer Order Submission Process” and is the time where dealers can then place orders for the Chevy Blazer, based on how many units were allocated to them.

- Late Q4, SORP. Being late Q4, this may be good news for those already eager to hop in. By the end of 2018, “SORP” or “Start of Regular Production” will begin, and the Chevrolet Blazer will go into production, now with an estimate of how many units need to be made.

 

2. Trim Lineup

Okay, less technical talk. There will be four trims planned for the 2019 Chevrolet Blazer - L, Cloth/Leather, RS, and Premier. Cloth/Leather replaces the LS/LT trim where consumers can upgrade for better options in terms of comfort, safety, and convenience. Each of these have definitive differences as well.

Blazer L and Cloth/Leather have a sleek modern and sporty look. The Blazer RS gets a little more aggressive, going for a blacked-out appearance with red accents and a unique grille design. Finally, the Blazer Premier comes with bright chrome accents and more refined styling. Can we expect anything less from the high-end trim?

 

3. Engine Lineup

Yeah, we know you were waiting for this, you’re so bad! So far, two engines have been named for the 2019 Chevrolet Blazer. Standard on the Blazer L and Blazer Cloth will be an ECOTEC 2.5-liter 4-cylinder engine; the Blazer Leather, RS, and Premier trims are powered by a 3.6-liter V6 engine. This engine is also available on the Blazer Cloth trim. Estimates for horsepower and torque have not yet been reported.

 

4. Key Competitors

It’s always weird to us when an automakers wants consumers to know who their competitors are, but the most obvious reason is so consumers can compare the Blazer with other vehicles and their features. So, for those interested, here they are:

 

- 2018 Ford Edge, with a starting MSRP of $30,310 (SE trim with front-wheel drive) up to $41,765 (Sport trim with all-wheel drive)

- 2018 Jeep Grand Cherokee, with a starting MSRP of $32,140 (Laredo trim with 4x2) up to $87,445 (Trackhawk trim with 4x4)

- 2018 Nissan Murano, with a starting MSRP of $31,775 (S trim with front-wheel drive) up to $44,805 (Platinum trim with all-wheel drive)

 

5. What Sets Blazer Apart from the Equinox and Traverse?

Good question. When an automaker gets a little saturated with a model class, consumers can wonder why even add another when so many are alike? So, Chevy made it easy for us, and them.

 

- The Chevrolet Blazer crossovers comes with only two rows, able to compete in the midsize SUV segment as well as the compact SUV segment

- In terms of length, the Blazer falls between the length, width, and maximum cargo volume of the Equinox and Traverse, making it suitable for either class

- Chevy is aiming to satisfy a specific niche of buyers - those that want more space than the Equinox but more style than the Traverse. Style and versatility are the key players for the Chevy Blazer.

Satisfied? Yeah, we doubt it. We’ll put up a landing page to give more details - there’s more information than you think. Excited? Let us know your thoughts on the Chevrolet Blazer on NowCar social media.

Photo Source/Copyright: Chevrolet

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